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of state and what he means to obama foreign policy. we will be talking to a man who put the fate of the keystone pipeline and the fate of the president's hands. we have dave heineman with his approval to give president obama a second chance. we begin with the obama party is campaign to ban assault weapons. they not only want to ban assault weapons but certain handouts. for more on what the democrats are trying to do to our second amendment rights, we bring in shannon bream. reporter: senator dianne feinstein acknowledges that it will be an uphill battle. this new measure would ban the sale and manufacture and transfer and importation of 157 specific garments, along with a broader group of other guns that will meet at a lower threshold for being classified as an assault weapon is the sale and transfer and gifting of anything classified as an assault weapon. >> no weapon is taken from anyone. the purpose is to try up the supply of these weapons over time. therefore there is no sunset on the spell of. reporter: the children in the newtown, connecticut, massacre would likely still be
as the front pages of the paper do you think that is the foreign policy legacy of his first term? >> i think it is. you can't really point to any successes. you heard him in that little sound bite saying we are going to lead. he has been saying the tied of war is receding. it's not reseeding. the tied of war is increasing in all kinds of places like west africa where it hadn't been. the dominance of the united states in the region ever since kissinger is receding. it is the absence of american influence and power which is creating a vacuum into which the jihadists are coming. that's the most important resistance of insurgents is it is in places where we didn't expect it like north africa. it is as if there were jihadists regimes or attacks in central america. that's now the europeans miss it. the number one issue is iran. the prime minister re-elected on tuesday say at the u.n. last year that in spring and summereh a point of no return at which he was announcing israel would have to act. i think obama is going to have to face that either to prevent the israelis in some way or to give a red l
of experiences. both in foreign policy and on the crime bill, the '94 crime bill is something he shepherded and his extraordinary ability to deal with senate republicans in a way a lot of people can't. senator reed and mitch mcconnell don't get along that well so i don't read nieg into it other than the president has an eset in the vice president and he's using that asset and he's deploying him well. the thing we should be mindful of is that there's over the next four years there's going to be a lot of tea leaf reading but at the end of the day, you know, the president is using the personing that get a job done and he's done an extraordinary job so far. let me say, passing this legislation will be tough. it's important to put your best feet on the ground there because it's really not -- it's going to be tough to get these bills passed. >> and it's not just ability. the vice president -- and again i worked closely with him for a few years -- he really likes this kind of political dealmaking in a way i don't think the president likes that much. if he's pushed to it he can do it. but the vice
of cool detachment has been his foreign policy hallm k hallmark. they are a catalyst present but not deeply involved. just to start you out on the huge threat of an iranian nuclear weapon, how does that facr into the second term? >> i think it's possible that this year there may be an action by israel against iran. it looked likely last year. i thought it was going to happen. and then it looked less likely. and people i'm speaking to think it is once again a possibility. that changes the entire dynamic. and this administration talks about wanting to shift to asia. sure, that sounds greatest. but i think it will be very difficult to do. especially in that happens. if the israelis decide after their elections that they are moving a little bit more to the right, if the iranian elections coming up bring that country even further to the right, it seems like some sort of clash is coming. that's just on the israel-iran. if you look -- broaden out a little bit, then you have syria, which is in state collapse, and is probably going to be in some sort of state of anarchy over the next
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
the speech, however, briep, was the absence of foreign policy. and the two really contentious appointments, or at least one is chuck hagel who is going to run the defense department. and the middle east is aflame again and now we're seeing it spread into africa in a way that is very hard to get a fix for what the model is dealing with it. these are failed states. we have tribalism again prevailing in africa and again in the middle east because islamic rage has not been distinguished. command and control of al qaeda they believe has been broken down, but as you saw in algeria in the past several days, this is going to be a continuing problem out there. that will go to the defense department, how it's run, how much money they have to spend, how they reorganized the response of that and secretary kerry would is going to pick up the baton from hillary clinton has to decide what's our relationship with egypt? how run by a muslim brotherhood. >> it's worth remarking on that because four years ago, as we all sat here, none of us expected every assumption you would make about the middle east for d
into the north africa region years ago. i'm afraid our foreign policy has not kept up. >> heather: and that's what i want to ask you about, the foreign policy. for months, u.s. officials, we have intensively lobbied algeria, whose military is by far the strongest in north africa, i think you would agree. we've lobbied them to intervene in next door mali where the rebels have established this well defended base of operations. why, in your opinion, have they not acted and why did they shun outside help in dealing with this latest hostage crisis? >> because they don't view it in their personal interest. the algerian government and military, they are very efficient. the military is very efficient. they're not subtle, as we've seen from the attack on the facility. we shouldn't be surprised at their aggressive reaction to this. they've been fighting extremist concerns for decade. but i think what it points out is again, we don't have much leverage there. you're right, we have been lobbying algeria hard to take a lead role in trying to recapture northern mali, but they don't view it that way. they
to one another must be equally as well. >> reporter: foreign policy was noticeably absent from his address though he harolded a decade of war, touting a recovering economy and acknowledged the lessons still ahead. >> the commitments we make to each other, these things do not sap our nation. they strengthen us. >> reporter: he gave mitt romney this line. >> they do not make us a nation of tears. ♪ la >> reporter: filling the air what patriotism, kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ the brave there was a poem and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the country. john? >> dan, that moment at the end of your piece where the president turned around and look
. the important foreign-policy issue of benghazi. it was something we were talking about a month ago, but it faded into the background. everybody will be watching tomorrow. it is a big deal to have the secretary of state come in. everyone wants to hear what she has to say about this. she becomes less of a focus because she's leaving, some say. but it will be really important hearing. the group publicans' want a special committee formed to investigate the because the issue, but they did not get that. all we will crb hearings where we get a picture of it from people who were heading the operation. so her parents will be very big tomorrow. guest: more broadly, on national security, we will enter the beginning of confirmation hearings for john kerry as secretary of state, chuck hagel as secretary of defense. consideration of our military strategy, our military spending, how we project american power as we complete a winding down of the war in afghanistan. it is really going to be the end of a post-9/11 period in national security policy, with the policy going for it from there still unsettled. guest:
administration's foreign policy and i urge his sped deacon firm mags. >> before leaving, just like her first day on the job four years ago -- >> i am absolutely honored and thrilled beyond words to be here with you. >> clinton is likely to say good-bye to the diplomat she's led and deliver a major speech on international policy. but her last days as america's high-flying top diplomat have been overshadowed by nearly a month of illness, the fallout over the deadly attack in benghazi. >> i think it's inexcusable that you did not know about this and that you did not read these cables. >> and her impassioned defense. >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened. >> i don't think it will be part of her legacy. >> beyond benghazi, former secretary of state madeleine albright says clinton did something big for america's foreign policy. >> i think she will be valued greatly for finding other parts than just military power for america the way that we use our influence. >> others, while praising clinton personally, charge the administration she's part of, failed
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
think there was a pretty strong sense today that not just on domestic policy, but even on some foreign policy, he moved. sometimes the criticism was he kept a little too much of bush, this was a breaking point. a lot of what lingered, some of the people, some of the policies seem to be pushed back now. >> was this the speech that liberals have been waiting for? >> sure it was. >> and now is it the foundation for the next several years? >> well, barack obama is a complicated man. we have to be honest about him. >> he is a deal maker. >> yeah, he is. and he is also a mediator. he really does believe in trying to bring people together. so we can't tell ourselves that he is going to give us everything we want. but what i thought from this speech was that he was saying, look, i know where you're at, the people who elected me. i know the coalition that elected me. if you keep the noise up, if you keep talking about this, i'll take care of you. i will watch for you. and he wasn't tossing them all under the bus. this was not a hey, i know you elected me, but now i can't do much for you. >> was
woods, a co-director of foreign policy in focus at the institute for policy studies. welcome to "democracy now!" let's start off with the hostage situation in algeria. what do you understand at this point? >> first, i think we have to extend condolences to those families of those to a lost life. situation is fluid. hostages reportedly have been taken coming from at least eight different countries, including britain, japan, ireland. there are still reports that not only those that have been killed coming potentially from britain, france, japan and other countries, but also this is a crisis that is still under way. the algerian military is still seeing this as an ongoing incident. the information is scant t and fluid, changing very rapidly. it is coming out very slowly because of -- remember, algeria is essentially a military state. information is not flowing freely. there is a reluctance to share information with international actors, particularly former colonial powers, given the history of what has happened in algeria. >> the reports are coming out initially saying many of t
bit about foreign policy and maybe a tiny bit about 2016. oh! progress-oh! -oh! -oh! oh! oh! ♪ what do you know? oh! ♪ bacon? -oh! -oh! oh! [ female announcer ] with 40 delicious progresso soups at 100 calories or less, there are plenty of reasons people are saying "progress-oh!" share your story for a chance to win a progress-oh! makeover in hollywood. go to facebook.com/progresso to enter. >>> we are back with former senator russ feingold, former house speaker newt gingrich and the stellar susan page and ron brownstein. thank you all for being here. i want to play you -- this is a couple of bits of the president talking about al qaeda and terrorism. >> al qaeda is on the path to defeat. war in afghanistan is winding down. al qaeda has been decimated. al qaeda's on the run and bin laden is dead. >> so my question out of this is algeria. northern africa has now, for a long time, we heard about yemen and somalia, places like that, but now hearing about algeria, mali. what -- it seems like it has become or been allowed to become a very dangerous place. >> this is something i worked on
another must be equal as well. >> reporter: foreign policy absent from his address, though he heralded the end of a decade of war, and touted the economy. >> the commitments we may teach each other, these things do not sap our nation, they strengthen us. >> reporter: the president mostly refrained from partisan jabs but appeared to single out his former gop opponent mitt romney with this line. >> they do not make us a nation of takers. ♪ >> reporter: filling the air with patriotism, the voices of kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ >> reporter: there was a poem and prayers. as he left the front of the capitol, a nostalgic president turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look one more time. i'm not going to see this again. >> reporter: before the president gets back to work, he heads to the washington national cathedral for an interfaith service for prayers to be offered up for the country and the president. it's a tradition that dates back to fdr. soledad. >> dan lothian, thank you. for the night and parties at night, really party mode in the nation's capital, while
. >> played guitar. >> bill: on all of the foreign policies joe cirincione will be along. lynn sweet from the "chicago sun-times" and jeff kelley, center from american progress on prospects for comprehensive immigration reform this year. and hillary clinton rules the day yesterday in the united states congress. but first... >> this is the "full court press." >> on this thursday, other headlines making news, in sports, a historic upset on the college hardwood last night. number one-ranked duke considered by that ranking as the best basketball team in the country, lost to the unranked university of miami and not by a close margin. 90-63. first time the hurricanes beat a number one team. they're now 14-3. >> i went to bed before the game was over last night. i was watching some of the highlights this morning. it was amazing. they never -- it was never close. they were blowing them away from the very beginning. >> bill: duke of all schools. >> big surprise. beyonce has remained silent thus far on her lip-syncing national anthem performance at the inauguration, other singers have weighed in in
it a foreign policy of hope and change. a change, and you let it happen and you hope it works out. you hope the secularists, when in actuality we know who's filled that vacuum it's been al-qaeda, and from libya and syria trying to take down the regime in egypt. in algeria, mali, across the board they're on the roll and this administration refuses to acknowledge it it. >> brian: what's interesting, whether you agree with president bush or not, he had a freedom agenda, would put advisors on the ground or domestic forces and go in there in quick strike operations. what is this president's mission, is it all about drones with hell-fire missiles? >> it seems like, afghanistan we're headed for the exits even sooner than he talked about on the campaign trail. he's got the quote, flexibility for the second term. i think he believes that with drone strikes and special operators he can affect things enough and anybody who's been on the ground knows it's intelligence on the ground, relationships, even if it's not a massive war front bilike iraq or afghanistan, it's events on the ground that affect not
. in that it was almost entirely about foreign policy. we would go anywhere, bear any price, pay any price, bear any burden to ensure the survival of liberty. this time, the president's foreign policy really was disspilled into seven words, a decade of war is now ending, the contrast of the last half century is striking. >> and jonathan karl who covers the white house for us, jon, i know you're in the capitol steps, the president saying we can't succumb to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone yet the bulk of the speech really praised and support and encouragement for all the things we do together through our government. >> george, i felt during much of that speech like i was listening to a democratic ronald reagan where reagan was unapologetically conservative. this was unapologetically progressive saying we must act collectively. and this was also bound with optimism saying america's possibilities are limitless. this was an effort, i believe, at that kind of optimistic progressivism whereas a reagan was your optimistic conservatism. also, i was very struck by on
fiscal cliff discussion, the economy is going to get zooming, we're going to -- foreign policy. >> it could end up being in foreign policy, drawing down troops, transitioning to this new kind of fighting force with the drone warfare, sort of in keeping with what we're alluding to eisenhower had. >> i think we're going to watch too very different but equally fascinating dramas play out. inside washington, the republicans still have the votes to stop the president on many things. they still control the house. they still have operational gridlock in the senate, if you will, even though democrats picked up. inside washington, the president has a challenge. but if you look at this, groundbreaking on gaye rights, back to climate change, gun control, immigration. and who that appeals to, as jack just said. they have made a doubling down of what they did in the campaign. they believe they have the coalition of the future -- young people, latinos, african-americans, and they believe the republican coalition is aging, in decline, and fractured. so they think politically they have the jui
off a foreign policy team to shape that as well that looks different. >> it does look different than the first term. it is about returning america home and defining what engagement looks like in a second term. he just got tax increases and he wants more revenue. if he can find a way to say i will cut sending in a big way and has the ability of splitting that republican coalition and he seems to be interested in doing. >> he was very close in the senate to the senator from oklahoma. if you spend 15 minutes with him as i did recently, he has ways to reduce spending on medicare that also improves service. the system is a mess. i think if i'm barack obama which obviously i'm not, but pafr ever we are in a bar and he's about to get inaugurated. >> would invite him to dinner about how to make medicare better and cheaper. >> here told us and tells a lot of people that's not who i am. i get a feeling the president is ready to get out of his comfort zone and reach out to democrats and republicans. >> there is this idea that the second term we have about a year and a half o
of the second administration. second term. >> foreign policy is your expertise. three weeks ago we would not have thought of africa being a threat to americans. what concerns you about that situation? what can the president do about going forward? >> i think if we're talking about mali and places around mali, the president should support those who are going to lead the french. the french have a unique relationship and interest in mali. i think we should support them to the extent we can. they're one of our nato allies and they have been a friend of ours. but we have to keep our eye on the places. i don't think it will require american soldiers on the ground, but we have to realize that al qaeda has been badly diminished. let's not overlook the success we have had. but it doesn't mean it's gone away. and it doesn't mean that every al qaeda cell is getting ready to attack the united states of america. they're doing other things in the region as well. so be vigilant. help our friends. i don't think there's a need for a commitment of american troops. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for b
about the risk that men and women of the foreign service take for our country. >> for me this is not just a matter of policy. it's personal. i stood next to president obama as the marines carried those flag-draped caskets off the plane at andrews. i put my arms around the mothers and fathers the sisters and brothers, the sons and daughters, and the wives left alone to raise their children. >> john: but for some republicans the issue wasn't the sacrifice americans make overseas but performing a human sacrifice of what was left of susan rice's reputation. as you'll recall there were over 20 protests against americans in the middle east that day related to a video. her comments were based on talking points prepared and approved by u.s. intelligence officials. just don't tell that to senator john mccain. he may have to switch his anger button to off. >> the american people deserve to know answers and they certainly don't deserve false answers. the answers given to the american people on september 15th by the ambassador of the united nations were false. >> john: that's mccain
building. thursday, january 24th, senate foreign relations committee will hold a confirmation hearing for secretary of state nominee john perry. that starts at 10:00 a.m. in the heart office building. and on friday, january 25th, georgetown public policy holds an inaugural conference on at- risk children, youth and system reform. it will be held at 8:30 a.m. at the georgetown university conference center here in washington. and that's your capital rundown for the week of january 21st, 2013. find us on myfoxdc.com and on twitter, #capital rundown. see you next week. >>> coming up later in sports, the wizards go down to the wire in los angeles and the capitals kickoff the season in tampa. we'll have the highlights later in sports. >> and rumors are swirling about a lady ga ga performance at one of the inaugural balls. we'll have a little bit more on that. >> but as we head to break, more inauguration facts. the first inauguration known to have been photographed was for james buchanan in 1857. james garfield was the first to view the parade from a stand built in front of the white house
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)